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Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), page 706

Pilot/Controller Glossary 12/10/15

an aircraft without the permission of the using
agency.
(Refer to AIM.)
(Refer to En Route Charts.)
e. Restricted Area- Airspace designated under
14 CFR Part 73, within which the flight of aircraft,
while not wholly prohibited, is subject to restriction.
Most restricted areas are designated joint use and
IFR/VFR operations in the area may be authorized by
the controlling ATC facility when it is not being
utilized by the using agency. Restricted areas are
depicted on en route charts. Where joint use is
authorized, the name of the ATC controlling facility

is also shown.

(Refer to 14 CFR Part 73.)

(Refer to AIM.)
f. Warning Area- A warning area is airspace of
defined dimensions extending from 3 nautical miles
outward from the coast of the United States, that
contains activity that may be hazardous to
nonparticipating aircraft. The purpose of such
warning area is to warn nonparticipating pilots of the
potential danger. A warning area may be located over
domestic or international waters or both.

SPECIAL VFR CONDITIONS- Meteorological
conditions that are less than those required for basic
VFR flight in Class B, C, D, or E surface areas and
in which some aircraft are permitted flight under
visual flight rules.
(See SPECIAL VFR OPERATIONS.)


(Refer to 14 CFR Part 91.)
SPECIAL VFR FLIGHT [ICAO]- A VFR flight
cleared by air traffic control to operate within Class
B, C, D, and E surface areas in metrological
conditions below VMC.

SPECIAL VFR OPERATIONS- Aircraft operating
in accordance with clearances within Class B, C, D,
and E surface areas in weather conditions less than the
basic VFR weather minima. Such operations must be
requested by the pilot and approved by ATC.
(See SPECIAL VFR CONDITIONS.)
(See ICAO term SPECIAL VFR FLIGHT.)
SPEED-
(See AIRSPEED.)


(See GROUND SPEED.)

SPEED ADJUSTMENT- An ATC procedure used to
request pilots to adjust aircraft speed to a specific

value for the purpose of providing desired spacing.
Pilots are expected to maintain a speed of plus or
minus 10 knots or 0.02 Mach number of the specified
speed. Examples of speed adjustments are:
a. "Increase/reduce speed to Mach point
(number.)"
b. "Increase/reduce speed to (speed in knots)" or
"Increase/reduce speed (number of knots) knots."

SPEED BRAKES- Moveable aerodynamic devices
on aircraft that reduce airspeed during descent and
landing.

SPEED SEGMENTS- Portions of the arrival route

between the transition point and the vertex along the

optimum flight path for which speeds and altitudes
are specified. There is one set of arrival speed
segments adapted from each transition point to each
vertex. Each set may contain up to six segments.

SQUAWK (Mode, Code, Function)- Activate
specific modes/codes/functions on the aircraft
transponder; e.g., "Squawk three/alpha, two one zero
five, low."
(See TRANSPONDER.)

STA-
(See SCHEDULED TIME OF ARRIVAL.)

STAGING/QUEUING- The placement, integration,
and segregation of departure aircraft in designated

movement areas of an airport by departure fix, EDCT,
and/or restriction.

STAND BY- Means the controller or pilot must
pause for a few seconds, usually to attend to other
duties of a higher priority. Also means to wait as in
"stand by for clearance." The caller should
reestablish contact if a delay is lengthy. "Stand by" is
not an approval or denial.

STANDARD INSTRUMENT APPROACH PRO-
CEDURE (SIAP)-
(See INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE.)
STANDARD INSTRUMENT DEPARTURE (SID)-
A preplanned instrument flight rule (IFR) air traffic
control (ATC) departure procedure printed for

pilot/controller use in graphic form to provide
obstacle clearance and a transition from the terminal

area to the appropriate en route structure. SIDs are
primarily designed for system enhancement to
expedite traffic flow and to reduce pilot/controller

PCG S-6

Page 706 of the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM.pdf)
AIM: Official Guide to Basic Flight Information and ATC Procedures

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