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AIM

10/12/17

5−4−17

Arrival Procedures

FIG 5−4−11

Minimum Vectoring Altitude Charts

1500

2000

3000

3000

3000

3500

2500

5000

5500

5

10

15

20

25

30

348

013

057

102

160

250

277

289

N

e. Minimum Vectoring Altitudes (MVAs) are

established for use by ATC when radar ATC is

exercised. MVA charts are prepared by air traffic

facilities at locations where there are numerous

different minimum IFR altitudes. Each MVA chart

has sectors large enough to accommodate vectoring

of aircraft within the sector at the MVA. Each sector

boundary is at least 3 miles from the obstruction

determining the MVA. To avoid a large sector with an

excessively high MVA due to an isolated prominent

obstruction, the obstruction may be enclosed in a

buffer area whose boundaries are at least 3 miles from

the obstruction. This is done to facilitate vectoring

around the obstruction.  (See FIG 5−4−11.)

1. The minimum vectoring altitude in each

sector provides 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle

in nonmountainous areas and 2,000 feet above the

highest obstacle in designated mountainous areas.

Where lower MVAs are required in designated

mountainous areas to achieve compatibility with

terminal routes or to permit vectoring to an IAP,

1,000 feet of obstacle clearance may be authorized

with the use of Airport Surveillance Radar (ASR).

The minimum vectoring altitude will provide at least

300 feet above the floor of controlled airspace.

NOTE−

OROCA is an off−route altitude which provides obstruc-

tion clearance with a 1,000 foot buffer in nonmountainous

terrain areas and a 2,000 foot buffer in designated

mountainous areas within the U.S. This altitude may not

provide signal coverage from ground−based navigational

aids, air traffic control radar, or communications

coverage.

2. Because of differences in the areas consid-

ered for MVA, and those applied to other minimum

altitudes, and the ability to isolate specific obstacles,

some MVAs may be lower than the nonradar

Minimum En Route Altitudes (MEAs), Minimum

Obstruction Clearance Altitudes (MOCAs) or other

minimum altitudes depicted on charts for a given

location. While being radar vectored, IFR altitude

assignments by ATC will be at or above MVA.

3. The MVA/MIA may be lower than the TAA

minimum altitude. If ATC has assigned an altitude to

an aircraft that is below the TAA minimum altitude,

the aircraft will either be assigned an altitude to

maintain until established on a segment of a

published route or instrument approach procedure, or

climbed to the TAA altitude.