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AIM

10/12/17

5−1−16

Preflight

FIG 5−1−2

FAA Flight Plan

Form 7233−1 (8−82)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

(FAA USE ONLY)

(FAA USE ONLY)

PILOT BRIEFING

PILOT BRIEFING

VNR

VNR

STOPOVER

STOPOVER

TIME STARTED

TIME STARTED

SPECIALIST

INITIALS

SPECIALIST

INITIALS

1. TYPE

1. TYPE

VFR

VFR
IFR

IFR
DVFR

DVFR

3. AIRCRAFT TYPE/

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

3. AIRCRAFT TYPE/

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

5. DEPARTURE POINT

5. DEPARTURE POINT

6. DEPARTURE TIME

6. DEPARTURE TIME

PROPOSED (Z)

PROPOSED (Z) ACTUAL (Z)

ACTUAL (Z)

7. CRUISING

ALTITUDE

7. CRUISING

ALTITUDE

8. ROUTE OF FLIGHT

8. ROUTE OF FLIGHT

KTS

KTS

9. DESTINATION (Name of airport

and city)

9. DESTINATION (Name of airport

and city)

10. EST. TIME ENROUTE

10. EST. TIME ENROUTE

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

HOURS

MINUTES

MINUTES

MINUTES

MINUTES

11. REMARKS

11. REMARKS

12. FUEL ON BOARD

12. FUEL ON BOARD

13. ALTERNATE AIRPORT(S)

13. ALTERNATE AIRPORT(S)

14. PILOT’S NAME, ADDRESS & TELEPHONE NUMBER & AIRCRAFT HOME BASE

14. PILOT’S NAME, ADDRESS & TELEPHONE NUMBER & AIRCRAFT HOME BASE

15. NUMBER

ABOARD

15. NUMBER

ABOARD

17. DESTINATION CONTACT/TELEPHONE (OPTIONAL)

17. DESTINATION CONTACT/TELEPHONE (OPTIONAL)

16. COLOR OF AIRCRAFT

16. COLOR OF AIRCRAFT

FAA Form 7233-1

FAA Form 7233-1

(8-82)

(8-82)

CLOSE VFR FLIGHT PLAN WITH _________________ FSS ON ARRIVAL

CLOSE VFR FLIGHT PLAN WITH _________________ FSS ON ARRIVAL

FLIGHT PLAN

FLIGHT PLAN

CIVIL AIRCRAFT PILOTS, FAR 91 requires you file an IFR flight plan to operate under instrument flight rules in
controlled airspace. Failure to file could result in a civil penalty not to exceed $1,000 for each violation (Section 901 of the
Federal Aviation Act of 1958, as amended). Filing of a VFR flight plan is recommended as a good operating practice. See also
Part 99 for requirements concerning DVFR flight plans.

2.  AIRCRAFT

IDENTIFICATION

2.  AIRCRAFT

IDENTIFICATION

4. TRUE

AIRSPEED

4. TRUE

AIRSPEED

4. Block 4. Enter your computed true airspeed

(TAS).

NOTE−

If the average TAS changes plus or minus 5 percent or

10 knots, whichever is greater, advise ATC.

5. Block 5. Enter the departure airport identifi-

er code (or the airport name, city and state, if the

identifier is unknown).

NOTE−

Use of identifier codes will expedite the processing of your

flight plan.

6. Block 6. Enter the proposed departure time in

Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) (Z). If airborne,

specify the actual or proposed departure time as

appropriate.

7. Block 7. Enter the requested en route altitude

or flight level.

NOTE−

Enter only the initial requested altitude in this block. When

more than one IFR altitude or flight level is desired along

the route of flight, it is best to make a subsequent request

direct to the controller.

8. Block 8. Define the route of flight by using

NAVAID identifier codes (or names if the code is

unknown), airways, jet routes, and waypoints (for

RNAV).

NOTE−

Use NAVAIDs or waypoints to define direct routes and

radials/bearings to define other unpublished routes.

9. Block 9. Enter the destination airport

identifier code (or name if the identifier is unknown).

10. Block 10. Enter your estimated time en

route based on latest forecast winds.